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Richard Cassirer

Born 1868
Died 1925

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German neurologist, born April 23, 1868, Breslau; died August 20, 1925, Berlin.

Biography of Richard Cassirer

Richard Cassirer studied in Freiburg im Breisgau. He received his doctorate in 1891 and subsequently was assistant at the psychiatric clinic in Breslau under Karl Wernicke (1848-1905) until 1893. He then went on a sustained educational tour to Vienna in order to continue his studies, with Richard von Krafft-Ebing (1840-1902) and Heinrich Obersteiner (1847-1922) among his teachers. In 1895 he came to the Berliner Poliklinik für Nervenkranke as the assistant to Hermann Oppenheim (1858-1919). With R. Hirschfeld he directed this clinic from 1919 until his death in 1925. In 1903 Cassirer was habilitated on the basis of a clinical study on tabes and psychosis, becoming titular professor in 1912.

Cassirer chiefly concerned himself with clinical neurology as well as the anatomy of the central nervous system; he investigated the vasomotor-trophical and here succeeded in defining the acroasphyxia chronica. He also investigated the anatomy of the vegetative system, the bulbar and spinal marrow diseases, poliomyelitis chronica, multiple sclerosis, prognoses and indications of the operative treatment of lesions of the peripheral nerves, muscular atrophy, etc. Literary his later years were mainly devoted to the new edition of Oppenheimer’s textbook.

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