- A dictionary of medical eponyms

Van Allen's syndrome

Alternative eponyms

  • Van Allen’s type of hereditary neuropathic amyloidosis

Related people

A hereditary form of amyloidosis involving both sexes originally reported in Iowa.

Description

A hereditary form of amyloidosis involving both sexes originally reported in Iowa in a family of Scottish-English-Irish extraction. Onset of symptoms is usually observed in the third or fourth decade with average onset at age 35 years. Neuropathy dominates at onset, involving all four extremities. It is usually followed by muscle weakness and atrophy, diminished deep-tendon reflexes, dysenthesia, shooting pain, and other neurological disorders of the extremities, lower limbs being more severely affected than the upper ones. Also severe peptic ulcer disease. Frequently, hearing loss and blurred vision (cataracts but no vitreous opacities). Commonly, impotence and sphincter disturbances. Average survival is 12 years from the onset. Inheritance is autosomal dominant.

Bibliography

  • M. W. van Allen, J. A. Frohlich, J. R. Davis:
    Inherited predisposition to generalized amyloidosis. Clinical and pathological study of a family with nephropathy and peptic ulcer.
    Neurology, Cleveland, Ohio, 1969, 19: 10-25.

What is an eponym?

An eponym is a word derived from the name of a person, whether real or fictional. A medical eponym is thus any word related to medicine, whose name is derived from a person.

What is Whonamedit?

Whonamedit.com is a biographical dictionary of medical eponyms. It is our ambition to present a complete survey of all medical phenomena named for a person, with a biography of that person.

Disclaimer:

Whonamedit? does not give medical advice.
This survey of medical eponyms and the persons behind them is meant as a general interest site only. No information found here must under any circumstances be used for medical purposes, diagnostically, therapeutically or otherwise. If you, or anybody close to you, is affected, or believe to be affected, by any condition mentioned here: see a doctor.