Sweet's syndrome

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A skin disease of unknown aetiology characterized by fever, painful plaques on the limbs, face, and neck; neutrophilic leukocytosis; and dense dermal infiltration with mature neutrophilic polymorphs.

Description

A skin disease of unknown aetiology characterized by abrupt onset of fever, raised painful plaques on the limbs, face, and neck; neutrophilic leukocytosis; and dense dermal infiltration with mature neutrophilic polymorphs. The plaques are dark red and resemble erythema multiforme in appearance but there is an associated neutrophilic leukocytosis and infiltrate into the lesion. Additional symptoms may include headache, arthralgia, conjunctivitis, and episcleritis. Febrile upper respiratory tract infection, tonsillitis, or influenza like illness often precede the appearance of skin lesions. Occurs mainly in middle-aged women. Some patients are acutely ill. Sweets description followed the observation of 8 female patients.

Bibliography

  • R. D. Sweet:
    An acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis.
    British Journal of Dermatology, Oxford, 1964, 76: 349-356.
  • W. P. D. Su and H. N. H. Liu:
    Diagnostic criteria for Sweet’s syndrome. Cutis, New York, 1986, 37 : 167–170.

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