Lipschütz' ulcer

Related people

A simple acute ulceration of the vulvae of the lower vagina of nonvenereal origin, forming a round shallow lesion without causing serious discomfort.

Description

A simple acute ulceration of the vulvae of the lower vagina of nonvenereal origin, forming a round shallow lesion without causing serious discomfort. There is also fever and lymphadenopathy. Bacillus crassus infection is believed to be the cause. A very rare and often misdiagnosed syndrome occurring in young women.

The cause and pathogenesis of the disease still remains unknown, and only some hypotheses are discussed in the literature. Lipschütz assumed that the disease is caused by autoinoculation with Bacillus crassuss (Döderlein's lactobacillus), while other physicians of his generation ascribed the disease to poor hygiene of the young women. In some cases, Epstein-Barr virus and Ureaplasma were identified. Recently, genital ulceration very similar to acute vulvar ulcer has been found in HIV-positive women.

Bibliography

  • B. Lipschütz:
    Über eine eigenartige Geschwürsform des weiblichen Genitales (Ulcus vulvae acutum).
    Archiv für Dermatologie und Syphilis, Wien, 1913, 114: 363-395. Über vulvae acutum. Wiener klinische Wochenschrift, 1918, 31: 461-464.

  • L. Török, K. Domján and E. Faragó
    Ulcus vulvae acutum.
    Acta dermatovenerologica Alpina, Panonica et Adriatica, 2000, 9 (1).

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