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John T. Martsolf - bibliography

Related eponyms

Biography

Canadian paediatrician

Bibliography

  • J. T. Martsolf, J. B. Cracco, G. G. Carpenter, A. E. O'Hara:
    Pfeiffer syndrome: an unusual type of acrocephalosyndactyly with broad thumbs and great toes.
    American Journal of Diseases of Children, Chicago, 1971, 121: 257-262.
  • L. Burd, J. T. Martsolf, and M. G. Klug,:
    Children with fetal alcohol syndrome in North Dakota: A case control study utilizing birth certificate data.
    Addiction Biology, 1996 1:(2):181-189.
  • L. Burd, J. T. Martsolf, J. Kerbeshian, T. Mohr, P. Mohr, and M. Ebertowski:
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Delineation and Management.
    Clinical Advances in the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders, 1996, 10, 1-8.
  • M. Bagheri, L. Burd, J. T. Martsolf, and M. G. Klug,:
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Maternal and neonatal characteristics.
    Journal of Perinatal Medicine 1998, 26 (4): 263-269.
  • Michele Clemens, John T. Martsolf, John G. Rogers, Patricia Mowery-Rushton, Urvashi Surti, Elizabeth McPherson:
    Pitt-Rogers-Dank syndrome: The result of a 4p microdeletion.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics (online), December 6, 1998, 66 (1):95-100.
  • J. T. Martsolf:
    Chief Complaint: Short stature in a 9 year old.
    In H. D. Wilson, editor: Pediatrics (Clerkship Series): 203-206. Fence Creek Publishing, Madison, Connecticut, 1999.
  • Larry Burd, John Martsolf, Marilyn G. Klug, Ellen O'Connor and Marlene Peterson:
    Prenatal alcohol exposure assessment: multiple embedded measures in a prenatal questionnaire. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 25 (2003) pp. 675-679.
  • Marilyn G. Klug, Larry Burd, Jacob Kerbeshian, Becky Benz and John T. Martsolf:
    A comparison of the effects of parental risk markers on pre- and perinatal variables in multiple patient cohorts with fetal alcohol syndrome, autism, Tourette syndrome, and sudden infant death syndrome: an enviromic analysis.
    Neurotoxicology and Teratology, November/December 2003, 25: 707-717.
  • Betty A. Poitra, Shirley Marion, Marilyn Dionne, Esther Wilkie, Paul Dauphinais, Marma Wilkie-Pepion, John T. Martsolf, Marilyn G. Klug and Larry Burd:
    A school-based screening program for fetal alcohol syndrome.
    Neurotoxicology and Teratology, November/December 2003, 25: 725-729.
  • Marilyn G. Klug, Larry Burd, John T. Martsolf and Mary Ebertowski:
    Body mass index in fetal alcohol syndrome.
    Neurotoxicology and Teratology, November/December 2003, 25 (6): 689-696.
  • Larry Burd, Marilyn G. Klug, John T. Martsolf and Jacob Kerbeshian:
    Fetal alcohol syndrome: neuropsychiatric phenomics.
    Neurotoxicology and Teratology, November/December 2003, 25: 697-705

  • Larry Burd, John T Martsolf, Tim Jeulson:
    FASD in the Corrections System: Potential Screening Strategies.
    Journal of FAS International, February 2004.
  • L. Burd, M. G. Klug, J. T. Martsolf:
    Increased sibling mortality in children with fetal alcohol syndrome.
    Addiction Biology, 2004, 9 (2): 179-186, 2004.
  • Larry Burd, Marilyn G Klug, John T Martsolf, Cathy Martsolf, Eric Deal, and Jacob Kerbeshian:
    A staged screening strategy for prenatal alcohol exposure and maternal risk stratification.
    The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, 2006, 126 (2): 86-94.

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