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Richard Bright - bibliography

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Biography

English physician, born September 28, 1789, Queen's Square, Bristol, Gloucestershire; died December 16, 1858, London.

Bibliography

  • De Erisipelate Contagioso.
    With this thesis, Bright received his M.D. on September 13, 1813. In it he pointed out the similarity of the spread of erysipelas from patient to patient and also noted that Dr. Alexander Gordon (1752-1799) of Aberdeen had in 1795 pointed out this similarity of the disease to puerperal sepsis. Gordon saw the contagiousness of puerperal fever half a century before Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis 1818-1865).
  • A. Gordon:
    A treatise on the epidemic puerperal fever of Aberdeen.
    London, G. G. & J. Robinson, 1795.
  • Travels from Vienna through Lower Hungary; with Some Remarks on the state of Vienna During the Congress in the Year 1814.
    Edinburgh, A. Constable, 1818.
  • A case of traumatic tetanus. The Lancet, 1825-1826, 9: 268-269.
  • A singular case. The Lancet 1825-1826, 9: 653.
  • Contagious nature of erysipelis. The Lancet, 1825-1826, 9: 717.
  • Reports of Medical Cases, Selected With a View of Illustrating the Symptoms and Cure of Diseases by a Reference to Morbid Anatomy.
    2 volumes (in 3), London, Longmans, 1827-1831. Facsimile reprint of volume 1, London,
    Goower Publishers & Royal Society of Medicine, 1985.
    This work, covering a large number of diseases, is one of the most important books in nineteenth century medical literature. The detailed case reports are models of clarity and conciseness and give ample evidence of Bright's skill as a clinician. Superbly illustrated throughout with hand-coloured plates.
    Bright personally carried the costs of production. A total of 250 copies were sold before 1861, when the remaining stock was destroyed by fire. One copy, Bright's own, with his autograph and address, 11 Savile Row, is included in the Bibliotheca.
    Bright differentiated renal from cardiac dropsy (oedema) and was first to correlate this and the previously observed albuminuria with the nephritic changes observed at the autopsy. Volume 2, polished in 2 parts, is one of the earliest and most important atlases in neuropathology.
  • Cases and observations connected with disease of the pancreas and duodenum.
    Medico-Chirurgical Transactions, London, 1832, 18: 1-56.
  • Cases and observations connected with diseases of the pancreas and duodenum.
    The Lancet, 1832-1833, I: 396.
  • Gulstonian Lectures on the functions of the abdominal viscera with observations on the diagnostic marks of the diseases to which the viscera are subject.
    London Medical Gazette, 1832-1833, 12: 281-287, 312-316, 345-350, 378-384, 411-418.
  • Cases and observations illustrative of diagnosis when adhesions have taken place in the peritoneum, with remarks upon some other morbid changes of that membrane.
    Medico-Chirurgical Transactions, 1835, 19: 176-216.
  • Cases and observations, illustrative of renal disease accompanied with the secretion of albuminous urine.
    London Medical Gazette, 1835-1836: 72-74.
  • Observations on the treatment of fever. Case of simple fever, protracted by irritation of the bowels, and attended by relapse.
    London Medical Gazette, 1835-1836, 17: 576-78.
  • Observations on the treatment of fever. Case of simple fever, protracted by irritation of the bowels, and attended by relapse.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1836, 1: 1-8.
  • Cases illustrative of the effects produced when the arteries of the brain are diseases selected chiefly with a view to diagnosis in such affections. Guy's Hospital Reports, 1836, 1: 9-32.
  • Permanent contraction of all extremities with numberless cartilaginous deposits in the arachnoid of the spinal marrow.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1836, 1: 33-35.
  • Fatal epilepsy, from suppuration between the dura mater and arachnoid, in consequence of blood having been effused in that situation.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, London, 1836, 1: 36-40.
    Bright was the first to describe unilateral (Jacksonian) epilepsy.
  • Cases of tetanus in which quinine and stimulants were administered very extensively with success.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1836, 1: 111-118.
  • Cases and observations, illustrative of renal disease accompanied with the secretion of albuminous urine.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1836, 1: 338-379.
  • Tabular view of the morbid appearances in 100 cases connected with albuminous urine, with observations.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1836, 1: 380-400.
  • An account of a remarkable misplacement of the stomach.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1836, 1: 598-603.
  • Observations on jaundice, more particularly on that form of the disease which accompanies the diffused inflammation of the substance of the liver.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, London, 1836, 1: 604-637.
    Original description of acute yellow atrophy of the liver.
  • Observations on the situation and structure of malignant diseases of the liver.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1836, 1: 638-648.
  • Cases and observations illustrative of diagnosis when tumours are situated at the base of the brain.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1837, 2: 279-310.
  • Observations on abdominal tumours and intumescence; illustrated by some cases of acephalocystic hydatids.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1837, 2: 432-492.
  • Right of Students. The Lancet, 1837-1838, 1: 95.
  • Observations on abdominal tumours and intumescence; illustrated by some cases of ovarian disease.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1838, 3: 179-286.
  • Retrospective address to the Medical and Chirurgical Society.
    The Lancet, 1837-1838, 1: 870.
  • Observations on abdominal tumours and intumescence; illustrated by some cases of diseases of the spleen. With remarks on the general pathology of that viscus.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1838, 3: 401-460.
  • Cases of spasmodic disease accompanying affections of the pericardium.
    London Medical Gazette, 1838, 23: 270-272.
  • Observations on abdominal tumours and intumescence; illustrated by cases of renal disease.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1839, 4: 208-264.
  • Elements of the Practice of Medicine.
    With Thomas Addison. 3 parts, London, Longmans, 1839.
    Originally issued in three parts from 1836 to 1839 when the authors were joint lecturers on medicine at Guy's Hospital.
    This joint undertaking by two of the most famous physicians in nineteenth-century Europe was intended as a "work at once elementary and practical to which teachers might refer their pupils as a companion and assistant during the period of their studies". More than sixty separate diseases and conditions are described, each accompanied by a lucid account of its history, causes, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment. Though the style is obviously dated, the descriptions of many of the diseases excel in accuracy and conciseness.
  • Internal concretion of phosphate of lime.
    London Medical Gazette, 1839-1840, 26: 76-77.
  • Cases and observations, illustrative of renal disease accompanied with the secretion of albuminous urine. Memoir the second.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1840, 5: 101-161.
  • Observations on abdominal tumours and intumescence; illustrated by cases of diseased liver.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1840, 5: 298-396.
  • Letter concerning the pathology of the kidney.
    London Medical Gazette, 1841-1842, 29: 707-708.
  • Account of the observations made under the superintendence of Dr. Bright on patients whose urine was albuminous.
    Guy's Hospital Reports new series, 1843, 1: 189-316.
  • Clinical memoirs on abdominal tumours and intumescence.
    Lectures collected by G. H. Barlow for the London. 1861. Biographical
  • George Hilaro Barlow (1806-1866):
    Eulogium on Dr. Bright. The Lancet 1843-44, 1: 244.
  • Some great men of Guy's. The Practitioner, London, 1906, 76: 727.
  • Fielding H. Garrison:
    Richard Bright's travels in Lower Hungary, a physician's holiday.
    Johns Hopkins Hospital Bulletin, 1912, 23: 173-182.
  • Sir William Hale-White:
    Bright's observations other than those on renal disease.
    Guy's Hospital Reports, 1921, 71: 143-157.
  • De L. Rochester:
    Richard Bright of Guy's Hospital.
    Annals of Medical History, 1923, 5: 301-305.
  • R. H. Oppenheimer:
    Thomas Addison and Richard Bright, contemporaries.
    Medical Journal and Record, 1927, 126: 107.
  • Walter C. Alvarez:
    A pioneer in geriatrics, R. Bright on diseases of the arteries and brain.
    Guys Hospital Report-1836, I, 9-40.
    Geriatrics, 1965, 20: 433-434.
  • Stewart J. Cameron and Lovell E. Becker:
    Richard Bright and Observations in Renal Histology.
    Guy's Hospital Report, 1964, 113: 159-171.
  • R. O. Weller and B. Nester:
    Histological reassessment of three kidneys originally described by Richard Bright in 1827-36.
    British Medical Journal, 1972, 2: 761-763.

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