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Hans Ritter von Baeyer

Born 1875
Died

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German orthopedist, born February 28, 1875, Strassburg.

Biography of Hans Ritter von Baeyer

Hans Ritter von Baeyer spent his time as a medical student in Jena and Munich, receiving his doctorate at the latter university in 1901. He was Max Verworn's (1863-1921) assistant in Göttingen as well as assistant to Ottmar von Angerer (1850-1918) and Fritz Lange (1864-1952) in Munich. He was habilitated in orthopaedics in Munich in 1908.

In 1918 von Baeyer was appointed professor extraordinary of orthopaedics at the University of Heidelberg, with "Mechano-Pathologie" as his main scientific field of work. The following year he came to the University policlinic clinic in Bergheimer Straße 28, Heidelberg, as full professor and physician-in-chief, and here the cornerstone of a new orthopaedic clinic was laid down. In 1922 he bought the orthopaedic clinic in Schlierbach, a small town near Heidelberg, and in 1929 "Badisches Landeskrüppelheim" (Wieleandheim), also in Schlierbach.

In 1930 von Baeyer was president of the 25th congress of the German Society for Orthopaedics (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Orthopädie). In 1933 he was dismissed from his job by the Nazis because of his Jewish ancestry.

We thank Hans C. von Baeyer for information submitted. Hans Ritter von Baeyer was his grandfather.
Information was also submitted by Patrick Jucker-Kupper, Switzerland.

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