Artur Biedl

Born 1869
Died 1933

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Hungarian pathologist and endocrinologist, born October 4, 1869, Ostern (Hungarian Kiskomlos), Banat, Hungary (nowadays Comlosu Mic, Rumania); died August 26, 1933 in Weissenbach am Attersee, Austria.

Biography of Artur Biedl

Artur Biedl studied medicine at the University of Vienna where he qualified and received his doctorate in 1892. The following year he became an assistant at the institute for experimental pathology under Salomon Stricker (1834-1898), Philipp Knoll (1841-1900) and Richard Paltauff (1858-1924).

Biedl was habilitated in 1896. He became ausserordentlicher Professor (professor extraordinary) in 1899 and was appointed full professor in 1902. (According to one source he was professor extraordinary from 1898 and wirklicher Extraordinarius from 1902).

His work on internal secretions, published in 1910, was the first comprehensive study on glands and their secretions. Because of this milestone in scientific development, Biedl is now regarded as the founder of modern endocrinology. In 1913 Biedl was offered the chair of experimental pathology at the German University of Prague and took over the propaedeutic clinic. Biedl, however, was not clinically oriented and left the beds in the care of his colleague Julius Riehl, a cardiologist.

In 1928 Biedl founded the Journal Endokrinologie.

We thank Patrick Jucker-Kupper, Switzerland, and Therese Biedl, for information submitted.

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