Bertram Welton Sippy

Born 1866
Died 1924

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American physician, born October 30, 1866, Neptune, Richland County, Wisconsin; died August 15, 1924, Custar, Mason County, Michigan.

Biography of Bertram Welton Sippy

Bertram Welton Sippy was the third child of Thomas Sippy and Laura Welton. He graduated from Rush Medical College in Chicago at the age 22 and received his doctorate in 1890. After first working as a railroad physician, he studied in Berlin and specialized in internal medicine at the University of Vienna. He subsequently worked exclusively in this discipline. From 1897 to 1906 he was instructor and assistant professor, from 1906 full professor of medicine at his alma mater. His name became well known through his work on digestive diseases. His treatment of ulcers with medicines instead of surgery gained him world-wide fame and he built a large fortune.

Unfortunately, the Sippy regimen did little to prevent ulcer recurrence, and Sippy's program was later superceded by more efficacious therapy. Further knowledge was contributed by two Australian physicians, Barry J. Marshall (born 1951) and J. Robin Warren (born 1937). In 2005 they were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, each 1/2 of the prize, "for their discovery of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease".

We thank Patrick Jucker-Kupper, Switzerland, for information submitted.

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