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Franz Dittrich

Born 1815
Died 1859

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German pathologist, born October 16, 1815, Nixdorf, Bohemia in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. This town later became Mikulásovice in Czechoslovakia, now the Czech Republic. Franz Dittrich died in Erlangen, Germany on August 29, 1859.

Biography of Franz Dittrich

Franz Dittrich studied in Prague under Joseph Hyrtl (1810-1894) until he received his doctorate in 1841. He then went to Vienna, and on returning to Prague received a position as assistant with his friends Rudolf Jaksch Ritter von Wartenhorst (1855-1947) and Franz Kiwisch Ritter von Rotterau (1814-1852). He subsequently became prosector of pathological anatomy and devoted his efforts to this discipline, of which he became professor in Prague in 1848, succeeding Anton Dlauhy (1807-1888).

In 1850 he was called as professor to the medical clinic in Erlangen, rejecting several invitations from other universities. He was properly rewarded in Erlangen, but already in 1856 fell ill with a brain disease that caused his death in 1859.

From 1845 Dittrich reported on his activities at the pathological institute of Prague in the Prager Vierteljahrsschrift für praktische Heilkunde. His topics there were cancer of the stomach, syphilis of the liver, heart stenosis, and inflammation of the musculature of the heart. Besides these papers, very few of his writings are worth mentioning.

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