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Charles Eugene Quinquaud

Born 1841
Died 1894

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French physician, born November 20, 1841, Lafat, Creuse; died January 9, 1894, Paris.

Biography of Charles Eugene Quinquaud

Charles Eugene Quinquaud entered medical school at Limoges in 1864 and in 1868 moved to Paris, where he obtained his doctorate in 1873. He was the last Interne des hôpitaux under Pierre Antoine Ernest Bazin (1807-1878) and it was Bazin who influenced him to study dermatology. He became médecin des hôpitaux in 1878, agrégé in 1883, and in 1886 chef de service at the Hôpital Saint-Louis, with Ernest Henri Besnier (1831-1909), Jean Alfred Fournier (1832-1915), and Jean Baptiste Emile Vidal (1825-1893) as colleagues. He was elected member of the Académie de Médecine in 1892.

Quinquaud contributed to many areas of medicine, being a skilled bacteriologist as well as a clinician, and with Nestor Gréhant (1838-1910) he developed a method for measuring blood volume using carbon monoxide (1882). He gave popular courses in internal medicine and pathology as well as dermatology and unselfishly supported Louis Brocq, enabling him to teach and see patients despite considerable opposition by some who were jealous of this young man’s meteoric success and popularity.

In 1880, 1885, and 1887 Quinquaud won academic prizes for his works. He was editor of the journal La médecine scientifique.

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